Episode 472: Okja: The Super-Pig Slaughterhouse

On the Overthinking it Podcast, we tackle “Okja,” the critical smash from Netflix and Bong Joon-ho starring Tilda Swinton and a giant CGI super-pig.

Peter Fenzel, Mark Lee, and Matthew Wrather gather the kaleidoscopic shards of Okja, the latest effort from acclaimed Korean director Bong Joon-ho, and try to figure out what the film has to say about, well, anything.

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Further Reading

Matthew Wrather started Overthinking It in 2008 with his smartest, funniest friends, and has hosted over 500 hours of podcasts on the site. An LA native, he is an actor and computer programmer, but has worked as a writer, tower bell-ringer, birthday party clown, poet, janitor, and call center manager. He also has a Twitter and a Tumblr.

4 Comments on “Episode 472: Okja: The Super-Pig Slaughterhouse”

  1. Margo #

    As a follow -up to Okja may I humbly suggest the excellent War For The Planet of The Apes? This film also deals with super-intelligent animals, is a lot of fun while being appropriately post-apocalyptically gloomy, and provides plenty of fodder for overthinking.

    “Fodder”. See what I did there?

    Reply

  2. Joseph Well Actually #

    There’s a case to be made for Bong Joon-Ho’s wildly inconsistent tone being more a feature than a bug. It’s something he’s always toyed with, going all the way back to Memories of Murder, which is nominally a police procedural but still manages to feature some weird slapstick elements.

    From what I’ve read, it’s a stylistic choice that’s more common among new Korean cinema than mainstream American films. You can see what a difference it makes, between Snowpiercer (which is meant more for international audiences and plays its dour sci-fi tone fairly consistently) and The Host (which is more a product of South Korea, and juggles family drama, physical comedy and creature feature horror in equal measure).

    I’d agree with you guys, though, that in Okja’s case it doesn’t necessarily make the movie any more coherent. For my money, it at least kept the story engaging, if not outright entertaining.

    Reply

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